Statements Made to IRS Special Agents

Houston Tax Attorney

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If you are contacted by an IRS special agent for an informal meeting, can statements made during the meeting be used against you in court? The answer is “maybe.” The court addresses this in United States v. Henry, No. 2017-0001 (D. VI 2018). Facts & Procedural History The IRS criminal investigation unit received a tip […]

Perception Can Be As Important as Substance in Tax Disputes

Houston Tax Attorney

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Taxpayers voluntarily submit information to the IRS.  The IRS not only evaluates the substance of this information, but also the taxpayer’s candor in preparing and providing the information.  The perception of candor is just as important as the substance in many cases.  The Guess v. Commissioner, T.C. Memo. 2018-97, provides an example of how things can […]

Failures in Reporting Taxes is Not Tax Obstruction

Houston Tax Attorney

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Does a taxpayer commit a felony offense if they pay a babysitter without withholding taxes, fail to keep receipts for charitable donations, or neglect to provide every record to an accountant? A strict reading of the law would suggest that these actions are felony offense. The U.S. Supreme Court recently addressed this in Marinello v. […]

Misappropriated Money Subject to Tax, Even if No Criminal Violation

Houston Tax Attorney

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The proceeds of criminal activities are taxable income. Money that is embezzled from an employer is taxable to the embezzling employee. But what about money transferred between friends with the agreement that one of them will invest the funds, but he instead uses the funds personally and in doing so did not violate a criminal […]

Do Criminal Convictions Deter Employment Tax Crimes?

Houston Tax Attorney

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Failing to pay taxes to the government is a crime. This includes failing to pay employment taxes withheld by employers from employee wages. The Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (“TIGTA”) just released a report suggesting that the government has failed to enforce employment tax crimes. The report argues that the IRS’s lax enforcement results […]

Asset Sale Did Not Trigger Transferee Liability for Buyers Taxes

Houston Tax Attorney

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In Sloan v. Commissioner, T.C. Memo. 2016-115, the U.S. Tax Court refused to apply transferee liability under Section 6901 to make a taxpayer who sold company assets to a third party liable for the third party’s tax liability. The court reached this conclusion even though there was some indication that the taxpayers’ advisers knew that […]

Where Did the Tax Protesters Go?

Houston Tax Attorney

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It has almost been twenty years since Congress enacted the Revenue Restructuring Act of 1998 (“RRA98”). RRA98 prohibits the IRS from designating taxpayers as “tax protesters.” What is a Tax Protester? A tax protester is someone who uses illegal methods to protest the tax laws. This often includes Constitutional and other arguments about the taxpayer […]